ICYMI: DATA FOR PROGRESS: VOTERS SUPPORT ALL PROVISIONS OF THE $3.5 TRILLION BUILD BACK BETTER BILL

69% of Voters — Including 68% of Independents — Support the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal

61% of Voters — Including 58% of Independents — Support Passing the $3.5T Build Back Better Plan Through Reconciliation.

Voters Support Keeping Every Build Back Better Initiative in the Budget Reconciliation Package

60% of Voters — Including 64% of Independents — Believe It’s Time For the Wealthy & Large Corporations To Pay Their Fair Share In Order  the Build Back Better Agenda

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal and the Build Back Better agenda are highly popular with voters across the political spectrum, according to the latest polling from Data for Progress and Invest in America. Additionally, voters support every provision of the Build Back Better agenda and want the plan passed through the reconciliation process.

KEY POINTS: 

  • We also tested support for the $3.5 trillion reconciliation plan that Democrats in the Senate are currently considering. We find that likely voters support this proposal by a +31-point margin. Democrats and Independents support this proposal by +74-point and +26-point margins.

  • Some moderate Democrats have expressed concern about the topline cost of the $3.5 trillion budget proposal. The concerns tend to not mention specific provisions. To that end, we tested to see if likely voters would actually want to cut any of the provisions of the Build Back Better Bill with the context that some lawmakers say it is too expensive. Of the nine proposals tested, a majority of likely voters want eight to remain in the budget — for the ninth proposal, a plurality wants it to remain in the bill.

  • When asked whether they prefer increasing taxes on wealthy individuals and corporations or not changing tax rates, a majority of voters (60 percent) said they wanted more taxes for the wealthy. Increased corporate and wealth taxes enjoyed support from 72 percent of Democratic voters, 64 percent of Independent voters, and 42 percent of Republican voters.

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Data For Progress: Voters Support All Provisions of the $3.5 Trillion Build Back Better Bill

As part of an August survey of likely voters nationally, Invest in America and Data for Progress tested support for both the Investment Infrastructure and Jobs Act (formerly the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework) and the Build Back Better bill, Congressional Democrats’ $3.5 trillion proposed budget.

This new polling again confirms that likely voters support the Investment Infrastructure and Jobs Act and all provisions of the $3.5 budget bill. We have now also found that likely voters don’t want any provisions cut from the bill. In addition, we find voter support for the bill’s size and pay-fors.

A Bipartisan Majority of Voters Support the Investment Infrastructure and Jobs Act

Likely voters support the Investment Infrastructure and Jobs Act by a +47-point margin (69 percent support, 22 percent oppose). Support for this bill extends across self-identifying partisan lines, with Democrats, Independents, and Republicans backing the bill by margins of +70, +47, and +21 points, respectively.

A Majority of Voters Support Passing $3.5 Trillion of Investments Through Reconciliation

We also tested support for the $3.5 trillion reconciliation plan that Democrats in the Senate are currently considering. We find that likely voters support this proposal by a +31-point margin. Democrats and Independents support this proposal by +74-point and +26-point margins. Forty percent of Republicans support this proposal and 52 percent oppose it.

Voters Support the Provisions of the $3.5 Trillion Reconciliation Package

We also tested support for some of the specific policies that may be included in the final reconciliation package. The most popular provision is investments in long-term care for seniors and people with disabilities, backed by a margin of +68 points. Modernizing school buildings and the electricity grid are both supported by margins of more than +50 points. By more than +30-point margins, likely voters support funding universal pre-K and a pathway to citizenship for undocumented individuals. By more than a +25-point margin, likely voters support lowering the Medicare eligibility age, creating a Civilian Climate Corps, and tuition-free community college. Lastly, by a +15-point margin, likely voters support extending child tax benefits.

Voters Do Not Want to Cut Any of the Provisions of the Build Back Better Bill to Make It Cheaper

Some moderate Democrats have expressed concern about the topline cost of the $3.5 trillion budget proposal. The concerns tend to not mention specific provisions. To that end, we tested to see if likely voters would actually want to cut any of the provisions of the Build Back Better Bill with the context that some lawmakers say it is too expensive.

Of the nine proposals tested, a majority of likely voters want eight to remain in the budget — for the ninth proposal, a plurality wants it to remain in the bill. Majorities of likely voters said they wanted long-term care (75 percent), modernizing the electricity grid (69 percent), modernizing K-12 schools (64 percent), a pathway to citizenship for undocumented people (53 percent), tuition-free community college (53 percent), and lowering the Medicare eligibility age (51 percent) to remain in the package. By +15-point margins, likely voters said they would prefer the creation of a Civilian Climate Corps and universal pre-K to remain in the bill. Finally, by a +8-point margin, likely voters prefer the extended child tax cuts to remain in the bill.

Voters Support Increased Government Investment

When asked if voters prefer increased government investment in our economy or stopping government investment, a majority of likely voters (54 percent) said they wanted more investment. Increased government spending enjoyed support from over three-quarters of Democratic voters and half of independent voters. Thirty-two percent of Republicans preferred increased government spending, while 61 percent of them preferred stopping investment.

Voters Say the Wealthiest Must Pay Their Fair Share to Fund Community Investments

When asked whether they prefer increasing taxes on wealthy individuals and corporations or not changing tax rates, a majority of voters (60 percent) said they wanted more taxes for the wealthy. Increased corporate and wealth taxes enjoyed support from 72 percent of Democratic voters, 64 percent of Independent voters, and 42 percent of Republican voters.

Toplines for this polling can be found here.

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